faces

Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about the art of interviewing.

Central Idea: To explain to my audience how to prepare for an interview, conduct them selves during an interview, and follow up after an interview.

INTRODUCTION

Attention Getter: How many of you have ever gone out on job interviews? How many of you have interviewed for a job that you were qualified for, yet not gotten the job? If you got the interview but not the job then chances are the interview cost you the job.

Significance: An interview is a communication interaction process between two (or more) parties that uses questions and answers to exchange information and influence one another (Barone, 1995, p. 8). Barone and Switzer, the authors of the book Interviewing Art and Skill, report that the employment interview is a major component in over 90 percent of all selection decisions in the United States. They also estimate that U.S. companies conduct more than 250 million selection interviews annually.

Credibility: Recently in my own career endeavors, I have become aware of the value of interview skills and my lack of them. As I set out to equip myself for a successful job and internship hunt, I thought to myself, “Wow, what perfect timing! I will use this research for my informative speech as well and kill two birds with one stone.”

Preview: First, I will explain to you how to prepare for an interview, then I will explain how to conduct yourselves during an interview, and finally, I will explain the follow up after an interview.

Transition: Let us begin by discussing how to prepare for an interview.

BODY

I. In their book, titled Interview for Success, Drs. Caryl and Ronald Krannich, emphasize these four areas that interviewees should prepare in.

a. The first area of preparation you should cover is reviewing your own strengths and goals.

i. Are you suitable for the position?

ii. Will the position satisfy your needs?

b. The second area of preparation you should cover is conducting research.

i. The more you know about the organization the better.

ii. Having thoughtful answers and intelligent questions is a great way to impress interviewers.

c. The third area of preparation you should cover is practicing answers to anticipated question.

i. Put yourself in the interviewers place and compile a list.

ii. After you have your list of questions, answer them.

iii. This is a great method of overcoming being caught off guard and stumbling through an interview.

d. The fourth area of preparation you should cover is compiling questions you have for the interviewer.

i. What are the exact responsibilities of the position?

ii. What type of benefits package does the organization offer?

iii. How soon do you need me to start?

Transition: Now that we have learned ways to prepare for an interview, let me explain how to conduct yourselves during an interview.

II. In his book, titled Sweaty Palms: The Neglected Art of being Interviewed, H. Medley, emphasizes these four areas as pivotal for the interviewee during the interview.

a. First, you want to show enthusiasm.

i. Don’t just say that you are interested, exhibit your interest through your words and body language.

ii. You will increase your odds of getting the position with a proper display of interest.

b. Second, you want to be aware of your attitude.

i. Your state of mind will have a direct affect on the outcome of the interview.

ii. Make every effort to project a positive image of yourself.

c. Third, you want to be sure to listen to the questions.

i. When an interviewer asks you a specific question, then respond with a specific answer.

ii. When an interviewer asks a question that can be interpreted in more than one way, ask for clarification.

iii. Take the time to think about your answers.

d. Fourth, you want to be aware of your appearance.

i. You want to dress to suit the job interviewer.

ii. You want to be freshly bathed for an interview.

iii. You want to clean and trim you fingernails for an interview.

Transition: Now that we have learned how to conduct ourselves during an interview, let me explain how to follow up after an interview.

III. In his book, The Quick Interview & Salary Negotiation Book, Michael Farr emphasizes these four steps as crucial in following up after an interview.

a. Set a specific time with the interviewer for a follow up call.

b. Make notes of the interview in case you need the information later.

c. Be sure to send a letter thanking the interviewer for their time and any consideration they give you.

d. Call when you agreed to.

CONCLUSION

Recap: In closing, this evening, I taught you how to prepare for an interview, how to conduct yourselves during an interview, and how to follow up after an interview.

Significance: Keep in mind that an interview is a communication process. With that said, I encourage you all to prepare yourselves to skillfully express and demonstrate that you are the perfect person for the position.

Memorable Close: Well, thank you for your time and attention this evening. One day soon you all will be heading off into the job market to hunt down your dream jobs. The information that I have equipped you with tonight will benefit you when that time comes. Happy hunting!

Bibliography

Barone, J.T., & Switzer, J.Y. (1995). Interviewing: Art and Skill. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon

Krannich, C.R., & Krannich, R.L. (1998). Interview For Success: A Practical Guide to Increasing Job Interviews, Offers, and Salaries. Manassas Park, VA: Impact Publications

Medley, H.A. (1993). Sweaty Palms: The Neglected Art of Being Interviewed. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press

Farr, J. M. (1995). The Quick Interview & Salary Negotiation Book. Indianapolis, I N: JIST Works, Inc.